Thursday, November 18, 2010

McDougall house


McDougall house, originally uploaded by freestone.

McDougall house
here in Tallahassee, blocks from where I live, is this house. from the Tallahassee gov. site.

One of the finest remaining antebellum homes in Tallahassee is the Brokaw-McDougall House. When first built in or around 1856, it was on the outskirts of town. Its original owner, Peres Bonney Brokaw, ran a prosperous livery stable business downtown, and also found time to serve in city government, the state legislature and in the Confederate Cavalry. His daughter married Alexander McDougall, then a recent immigrant from Scotland. Members of the Brokaw and McDougall families lived in the house until it was sold to the State of Florida in 1973. The state made the house available for conferences, receptions, meeting space and special events. It also served as the headquarters of the Historic Tallahassee Preservation Board until May 1997. January 1998 the City of Tallahassee leased the house from the State of Florida for $1 a year and began operations and management of the facility. It continues to be used as a popular conference and event site.

Architecturally, the house is an outstanding Classical Revival building with strong Italianate influences. The formal gardens were laid out in the early 1850's prior to the construction of the main house. They were restored as a Bicentennial project of the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs.
====
once was 300 acres and outside of town. Now deep inside.


Whenever I see this house, as I live a couple of blocks away, the house has long long ago been "swallowed" by the city so that there are only a couple of acres of land left to this house, I am reminded of that book written by a 1880 New York Times reporter who came here to report the capital news [Tallahassee is the state capital].
the book, I think, was called TALLAHASSEE LADY; a book about a new York times reporter who came to report the capital news during the 1880s.
In the book, the reporter comes into the city by carriage, from the train station and as he passes by a plantation house *like* this one, he sees a pretty young lady in the yard. he soon gets to know her and falls in love with her. She, however, is Promised to another man in marriage, another plantation owner.
The book, in its writing techniques, Links the beauty of the area of the countryside that is of Tallahassee, with the beauty of this lady. He comes from the cold cloudy Northland where winter rules six months of the year and he arrives here in late January where the flowers are blooming and the trees are green and the sun shines brightly at 70 degrees or higher, even in January.
He learns to play the piano and begins to enjoy the Southern ways of life: his Soul Opens Up. Tallahassee and that lady inspires his soul to grow.

Alas, she gets married and he has to return back to New York, but he understands, anyways, that she could not live in the cold city of new York, even if he were to marry her!
Thus he knows that she must marry this other man, even as she Loves him more than he!

He returns to the north. At night, sometimes, in his dreams, he dreams of scented magnolias under a full moon. Thus When awake he knows that once his soul has Opened, he can appreciate the
beauty around him, even in new York city! He can live like he were still living in this strange and wonderful southern city, at least in his heart, even as he is walking the streets of New York!

Uploaded by freestone on 18 Nov 10, 2.31PM EST.

No comments:

Post a Comment